Some Limoncellos by Larry Miller

The True Story of the Italian Liqueur Limoncello

Limoncello is the Italian word referring to an intensely lemon-flavored liqueur most famously associated with and produced in Sorrento, the Amalfi coast, and the island of Capri, but also very popular throughout all of Italy.

Limoncello is made ​​from lemon zest (strictly non-treated), water, alcohol, and sugar. It is a beverage usually consumed after meals, but is a perfect drink for every occasion.

Preparation is easy but meticulous: if executed with accuracy, in a bit less than three months, the traditional yellow liquor will be ready to be enjoyed as an aperitif or a digestive, before or after a meal.

As in the best tradition of Italian hospitality, Limoncello was offered to Robert Langdon, the main character in Dan Brown’s Inferno, as well as to his travel companion Sienna Brooks and Dr. Ferris, by the owner of a large boat called the Mendacium, which escorts them to Venice’s Piazza San Marco.

Old wine vending window, Florence by Ieiris202

Little Wine Windows around Florence

Have you ever noticed those small little windows indented into the walls of the old palazzi in Florence? Miniature copies of their full size counterparts, the main entrances to each palazzo, are made of solid wood, are sometimes decorated with carvings or iron studs, and even have their own little knocker.
Known as bucchette del vino, they come complete with jambs and Romanesque or Gothic style arches hewn in the local stone.

Composition, 1955. Di Willem de Kooning [Da Kandinsky a Pollock, Palazzo Strozzi]

From Kandinsky to Pollock at Palazzo Strozzi, Florence

Palazzo Strozzi, located in Florence, the city of the Renaissance and of the poet Dante Alighieri, is currently hosting a major exhibition showcasing over one hundred works of European and American art from the 1920s to the 1960s. These works of art serve as a narrative that reconstructs relationships and ties between the museums of two American collectors, Solomon R. Guggenheim and his niece Peggy Guggenheim, which are located in New York City and Venice, respectively.

Scoppio del carro by Monica Kelly

Easter 2016: Religious and Culinary Traditions in Florence, Italy

If you haven’t decided what to do during the Easter holiday 2016, the Italian city of Florence could be the perfect destination. Though the city center is crowded, there is a special atmosphere in the air; people are happier and simply want to go out and celebrate. Maybe it’s because Spring is finally here. Or maybe it’s because of Easter itself and the Explosion of the Cart.

Fontana del porcellino, Florence by Andy Hay

The “Fontana del Porcellino”: Superstitions Rituals and Traditions

“In the city of Florence, there is a beautifully crafted bronze pig. Fresh, clear water flows from the mouth of the animal, which has become dark green due to its age. Only the snout shines, as it had been polished.”
With these words Hans Christian Andersen, the Danish author and writer of plays, travelogues, novels, poems, and fairy tales described the famous Fontana del Porcellino, which is located in the Loggia del Mercato Nuovo, near Ponte Vecchio.

Via di Belvedere by Nicola CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Florence Town Walls

The city of Florence used to be surrounded by high defensive walls. In Dan Brown’s Inferno, the adventures of the main character Robert Langon take place in this city.
The city walls surrounding Florence have been widened and rebuilt over the centuries six different times (although the actual count is controversial) to defend the city, which has undergone various expansions and contractions. Fortunately, solid and impressive remnants of the ancient city walls still survive: the doors (porte) and a few towers.

Fort Belvedere: the main building

Fort Belvedere

Fort Belvedere, located on the southern hills of the Arno River (specifically, on the highest hill of Boboli Gardens) in the Quarter of San Niccolò, is often referred to as «the most beautiful terrace in Florence». It is the second largest fortress to be built in Florence and was once connected to Palazzo Vecchio via the Vasari Corridor. From here, Robert Langdon, the main character in Dan Brown’s Inferno, would have the best panoramic view of Florence, the city in which his adventure in Italy begins.