Dan Brown's Inferno

Inferno’s Characters: Bertrand Zobrist

Bertrand Zobrist is a fictional character created by American author Dan Brown, the main antagonist in Brown’s novel Inferno.

Zobrist is a genetic engineer and Swiss billionaire. He doesn’t appear physically in the narrative given that his suicide takes place prior to the novel’s events. Instead, he is only seen in flashbacks of other characters, like the Provost, the head of the Consortium, a shadowy consulting group.

The Tabernacle by Orcagna in Orsanmichele, Florence

Andrea Orcagna

Andrea Orcagna, originally known as Andrea di Cione, was one of the most prominent Florentine painter, sculptor, and architect of the mid-14th century. He is mentioned in Dan Brown’s latest novel Inferno. To be specific, the novel’s main character Robert Langdon refers to the terrifying black demon whose red hair is smeared with the blood of his victims and who is attributed to Orcagna.

Gustave Dorè - Inferno 21

Paul Gustave Doré

Paul Gustave Doré was a prolific French engraver, artist, illustrator, sculptor, and primarily, wood and steel carver.

Robert Langdon, the main character in Dan Brown’s Inferno, being a renown Dante scholar, exhibited a Gustave Doré lithograph depicting a dark entrance to a tunnel carved into the face of an austere cliff during a conference hosted by one of the world’s oldest Dante societies—the Società Dante Alighieri Vienna. Moreover, during one of his adventures, Langdon refers to Doré’s work Dandolo Preaching the Crusade.

Tomb of the Antipope Giovanni XXIII, Florence, Italy

The Antipope Giovanni XXIII and his Tomb in the Baptistry of Florence

Robert Langdon, the main character in Dan Brown’s Inferno, in describing the Baptistry of Florence was attracted to the suspended tomb of Antipope Giovanni XXIII (John XXIII). To Langdon, it seems that the antipope’s body lies in repose high up on the wall like a cave dweller or a subject in a magician’s levitation trick.

The real name of this tomb made of marble and bronze is Baldassare Coscia. It was created, according to the art historians, by the Italian sculptors Donatello and Michelozzo for the Florence Baptistry.

Niccolò Machiavelli by Santi di Tito

Niccolò Machiavelli

The ends justify the means,” is this the expression used by Sienna Brooks in the novel Inferno, from the notorious Florentine political theorist Machiavelli.

Niccolò Machiavelli (May 3, 1469, Florence – June 21, 1527, Florence) was an Italian Renaissance political philosopher and statesman, as well as secretary of the Florentine Republic. His most famous work, Il Principe (The Prince), brought him great renown.

Portrait of Bianca Cappello, Florence

The Duchess Bianca Cappello

Bianca Cappello (1548, Venice – October 20, 1587, Poggio, near Florence) was an Italian noblewoman and the daughter of Bartolomeo Cappello and Pellegrina Morosini. Both of her parents belonged to the oldest and most famous families in the Venetian aristocracy.

She was renowned for her beauty and intelligence, and her court intrigues were the most scandalous of her time. Her life is known through a mix of history and legend.