The Uffizi Gallery Florence, Italy

The Uffizi Gallery

Galleria degli Uffizi (Uffizi Gallery) is an art museum in Florence and is one of the oldest and most famous art museums in the Western world. In his Inferno Dan Brown mentions it many times, referring to it as “world-famous.”

The Uffizi Gallery has the world’s finest collection of Italian Renaissance paintings, particularly those of the Florentine school. It also has antiques, sculptures, and more than 100,000 drawings and prints.

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Niccolò Machiavelli by Santi di Tito

Niccolò Machiavelli

The ends justify the means,” is this the expression used by Sienna Brooks in the novel Inferno, from the notorious Florentine political theorist Machiavelli.

Niccolò Machiavelli (May 3, 1469, Florence – June 21, 1527, Florence) was an Italian Renaissance political philosopher and statesman, as well as secretary of the Florentine Republic. His most famous work, Il Principe (The Prince), brought him great renown.

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Portrait of Bianca Cappello, Florence

The Duchess Bianca Cappello

Bianca Cappello (1548, Venice – October 20, 1587, Poggio, near Florence) was an Italian noblewoman and the daughter of Bartolomeo Cappello and Pellegrina Morosini. Both of her parents belonged to the oldest and most famous families in the Venetian aristocracy.

She was renowned for her beauty and intelligence, and her court intrigues were the most scandalous of her time. Her life is known through a mix of history and legend.

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The Grand Hotel Baglioni, Florence

The Grand Hotel Baglioni in Florence

In Dan Brown’s novel Inferno, the Grand Hotel Baglioni in Florence is mentioned near the last part of the story, precisely when professor Langdon, Sienna Brooks, and Dr. Ferris go to Venice.

“As they approached the train station, they passed the Grand Hotel Baglioni, which often hosted events for an art conference Langdon attended every year. Seeing it, Langdon realized he was about to do something he had never before done in his life. I’m leaving Florence without visiting the David.”

The Grand Hotel Baglioni symbolizes Florentine hospitality;

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The Arno River, Florence

The Arno River

The Arno is a river that flows in the Italian region of Tuscany. It is the most important river in central Italy after the Tevere (the Tiber).

It is 241 kilometres long and covers ​​8228 square kilometres.

It crosses and neatly divides Florence into two parts, the city in which Dan Brown’s novel Inferno is set.

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