François_vase_frontal_

The François Vase

The François Vase is a large Attic volute krater decorated in the black-figure style.
A real masterpiece of ancient pottery and the epitome of black-figure painting, the François Vase can be considered a landmark in the study of Greek pottery as it marks a turning point in the art’s development, constituting a great advance in Athenian pottery and painting styles.

The Last Judgement by Alun Salt

The Last Judgement by Michelangelo in Rome

The Last Judgement is the name of the fresco located on the wall behind the altar of the Sistine Chapel in Rome. It was designed and realized by the Renaissance master Michelangelo Buonarroti between 1533 and 1541.

It depicts the Second Coming of Christ as well as the final and eternal Judgement by God on all humanity according to the Christian religion. Altogether there are over 300 figures, with nearly all the males and angels originally shown as nudes.

Michelangelo’s masterpiece was inspired by Dante’s Divine Comedy and is mentioned by Dan Brown in his Inferno.

Francesco Botticini_The Assumption of the Virgin

Botticini’s Palmieri Altarpiece and the exhibit at London’s National Gallery

Botticini‘s vast altarpiece “Assumption of the Virgin” is a painting undertaken in tempera on a wood panel by the Early Renaissance Italian painter Francesco Botticini. It was originally installed in the church of San Pier Maggiore in Florence in 1477. The altarpiece remained there until 1784, when the church was demolished. It was then purchased by the National Gallery in the 1880s, but hasn’t been put on display for many years. During the past months, it has been the subject of the exhibition “Visions of Paradise: Botticini’s Palmieri Altarpiece” at London’s National Gallery

Composition, 1955. Di Willem de Kooning [Da Kandinsky a Pollock, Palazzo Strozzi]

From Kandinsky to Pollock at Palazzo Strozzi, Florence

Palazzo Strozzi, located in Florence, the city of the Renaissance and of the poet Dante Alighieri, is currently hosting a major exhibition showcasing over one hundred works of European and American art from the 1920s to the 1960s. These works of art serve as a narrative that reconstructs relationships and ties between the museums of two American collectors, Solomon R. Guggenheim and his niece Peggy Guggenheim, which are located in New York City and Venice, respectively.

Tavola Doria

The Tavola Doria

The Battle of Anghiari is one of the world’s most controversial and mysterious masterpieces. Leonardo da Vinci began painting it on a wall in Florence’s Palazzo Vecchio in 1503, leaving it unfinished. We only have copies of the fresco. One of these is La Tavola Doria, an anonymous sketch dating to the sixteenth century and representing the…